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Coronavirus outbreak labelled as pandemic by World Health Organization WHO. WHO named it as "Covid-19". The Wuhan Coronavirus "Covid-19" outbreak is a public health emergency of international concern, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared, but WHO warned governments not to impose travel or trade restrictions on China.

Never underestimate Coronavirus. WHO requests the public to understand the dangers of coronavirus and follow the recommended health practices.
*Limit traveling
*Maintain physical distance
*Wear a face mask
*Wash hands regularly

If you have fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical care early

Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. Follow the directions of your local health authority.

World Stats (As at July 18, 2020)

­čśĚ About 600,560 deaths

­čśĚ About 14,244,000 infected (Confirmed Positive +)

­čśĚ About 60,200 critical

­čśĚ About 8,510,000 Recovered & Discharged

­čśĚ Spread to 213 countries and territories

NoCountryCasesDeaths
1USA3,773,207142,106
2Brazil2,049,14077,964
3UK294,06645,273
4Mexico331,29838,310
5Italy243,96735,028
6France174,67430,152
7Spain307,33528,420
8India1,055,93226,508
9Iran271,60613,979
10Peru345,53712,799
Highest deaths by country

Live Blog...Updating..

Government officials, spouses, VIPs positive for Cornaviris

Boris Johnson - UK's Prime Minister


Carmen Calvo
: Spain's deputy prime minister tested positive for coronavirus on March 25, the Spanish government said.

Prince Charles: the Prince of Wales and heir to the British throne tested positive for the coronavirus on March 25. The 71-year-old is displaying mild symptoms "but otherwise remains in good health" said a spokesoman for the Clarence House royal residence, adding that he was self-isolating at a royal estate in Scotland. Prince Charles's wife, Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, has also been tested but does not have the virus.

Abba Kyari: The Nigerian president's influential chief of staff has tested positive for coronavirus, a source with direct knowledge of the matter said March 24. In his 70s, Kyari is an important figure in President Muhammadu Buhari's government.

Rand Paul: The Republican of Kentucky is first United States senator to test positive for coronavirus.

Prince Albert: Monaco's Prince Albert II has tested positive for the novel coronavirus, the principality said in a statement on Thursday, adding there were "no concerns for his health". The titular head of the Mediterranean enclave is continuing to work from his private apartments at the royal palace, the statement said.

Michel Barnier: The European Union's chief Brexit negotiator said in a tweet that he has tested positive for the virus.

Bento Albuquerque: Brazil's President Jair Bolsonaro said on Wednesday that Mines and Energy Minister Bento Albuquerque has tested positive for coronavirus - the second cabinet member to be infected in the country.

Augusto Heleno: Brazil's national security advisor said on March 18 on his Twitter account that he has tested positive for coronavirus, though he did not have any symptoms. Heleno, 72, a retired army general and one of Bolsonaro's closest aides, said he is currently under quarantine at his home while waiting for a second-test confirmation.

Antonio Vieira Monteiro: The chairman of the Portuguese unit of Santander, Spain's largest bank, died from the coronavirus on Wednesday, the second victim of the disease in Portugal. Vieira Monteiro, 73, became chairman of Santander Totta in 2019 after seven years as chief executive.

Jeremy Issacharoff: Israel's ambassador to Germany has tested positive for the coronavirus, the Israeli Foreign Ministry said in a statement March 17. The Israeli diplomat at the embassy in Berlin was reported to have contracted the virus, following a meeting with a deputy from the Federal Assembly of Germany, whose name was not mentioned.

Friedrich Merz: The 64-year-old politician, who has been campaigning to lead Germany's Christian Democratic Union (CDU) at a congress planned for this year, said on Twitter on March 17 that he tested positive for coronavirus and was under self-quarantine at home.

Kozo Tashima: The head of Japan's football association tested positive for the virus on March 17. Tashima is also deputy head of Japan's Olympic Committee.

Nadine Dorries: A minister in the United Kingdom's health department was the first British politician to test positive on March 10.

Peter Dutton: The Australian home affairs minister is under quarantine in hospital after contracting the virus.

Massoumeh Ebtekar: The Iranian vice president is the country's top government official to be infected by the virus, which has also affected several senior officials in the country. Iraj Harirchi, Iran's deputy health minister, is also stricken. Iran is the epicentre of the coronavirus outbreak in the Middle East.

Sophie Gregoire Trudeau: On March 12, the wife of Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau tested positive for COVID-19 following a trip to the United Kingdom. Gregoire Trudeau said she planned to remain in isolation for the next two weeks, together with her husband. Her symptoms have been described as mild.

Begona Gomez: Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez's wife tested positive, officials in his office said late on Saturday. While Begona Gomez tested positive, the health of both she and the prime minister was fine, the officials said. Spain said it would place the entire country under lockdown as the number of diagnosed cases exceeded 6,000.

Quim Torra: The local leader of SpainÔÇÖs Catalonia region said on March 16 that he had tested positive for the coronavirus and that he was going into self-isolation in a government building.

Pere Aragones: The Catalan deputy head of government announced on March 15 that he had also tested positive for coronavirus.

Irene Montero: The Spanish minister tested positive on March 15 and has been put under quarantine along with her partner, Deputy Prime Minister Pablo Iglesias.

Franck Riester: Earlier this week, the French culture minister said he was staying at his home in Paris after contracting the virus. France has also imposed a partial lockdown to check the spread of COVID-19.

Francis Suarez: In the United States, Miami city's mayor confirmed, on March 13, that he has contracted COVID-19.

Fabio Wajngarten: The press secretary for Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro tested positive after he returned from a US trip where he met, among others, US President Donald Trump, who later tested negative for the virus.

Michal Wos: Poland's environment minister has tested positive for coronavirus, he said in a tweet on March 16 .

Oumarou Idani: Burkina Faso's minister of mines has tested positive.

Stanislas Ouaro: Burkina Faso's minister of education is confirmed to have COVID-19.

Simeon Sawadogo: Burkina Faso's interior minister has the new coronavirus.

Alpha Barry: Burkina Faso's foreign minister tested positive for COVID-19, he said on Twitter on March 20.

Celebrities:
Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson: The popular Hollywood couple announced on March 11 that they were infected by the coronavirus and were placed in quarantine in a Gold Coast hospital in Australia.

Luis Sepulveda: The best-selling Chilean writer, who lives in northern Spain, also said he was infected. Reports say he showed symptoms of the coronavirus in February, after he returned from a literary festival in Portugal.

Olga Kurylenko: The French actress, who starred in the Bond movie Quantum of Solance, announced on March 15 that she had tested positive for the coronavirus.

Idris Elba: The British actor and musician said he has tested positive for COVID-19 on March 16 in a video posted on Twitter, and that although he had no symptoms so far he was isolating himself from others.

What is a coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are an extremely common cause of colds and other upper respiratory infections. These viruses are zoonoses, which means they can infect certain animals and spread from one animal to another. A coronavirus can potentially spread to humans, particularly if certain mutations in the virus occur.

Chinese health authorities reported a group of cases of viral pneumonia to the World Health Organization (WHO) in late December 2019. Many of the ill people had contact with a seafood and animal market in Wuhan, a large city in eastern China, though it has since become clear that the virus can spread from person to person.

What are the symptoms of this coronavirus?

China Wuhan Corona Virus in Sri Lanka Korona Health Alert

The symptoms can include a cough, possibly with a fever and shortness of breath. There are some early reports of non-respiratory symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Many people recover within a few days. However, some people ÔÇö especially the very young, elderly, or people who have a weakened immune system ÔÇö may develop a more serious infection, such as bronchitis or pneumonia.

How is it treated?

Scientists are working hard to understand the virus, and Chinese health authorities have posted its full genome in international databases. Currently, there are no approved antivirals for this particular coronavirus, so treatment is supportive. For the sickest patients with this illness, specialized, aggressive care in an intensive care unit (ICU) can be lifesaving.

Should you worry about catching this virus?

Unless youÔÇÖve been in close contact with someone who has the coronavirus ÔÇö which right now, typically means a traveler from Wuhan, China who actually has the virus ÔÇö youÔÇÖre likely to be safe. In the US, for example, only two cases of the virus have been confirmed so far, although this is likely to change.

While we donÔÇÖt yet understand the particulars of how this virus spreads, coronaviruses usually spread through droplets containing large particles that typically can only be suspended in the air for three to six feet before dissipating. By contrast, measles or varicella (chickenpox) spread through smaller droplets over much greater distances. Some coronaviruses also have been found in the stool of certain individuals.

So itÔÇÖs likely that coughs or sneezes from an infected person may spread the virus. ItÔÇÖs too early to say whether another route of transmission, fecal-oral contact, might also spread this particular virus.

Basic infectious disease principles are key to curbing the spread of this virus. Wash your hands regularly. Cover coughs and sneezes with your inner elbow. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with your hands. Stay home from work or school if you have a fever. Stay away from people who have signs of a respiratory tract infection, such as runny nose, coughing, and sneezing.

Wash your hands frequently

Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.

Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that may be on your hands.

Maintain social distancing

Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.

Why? When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.

Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth
Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.

Practice respiratory hygiene
Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately.

Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.

If you have fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical care early
Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. Follow the directions of your local health authority.

Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.

Stay informed and follow advice given by your healthcare provider
Stay informed on the latest developments about COVID-19. Follow advice given by your healthcare provider, your national and local public health authority or your employer on how to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on whether COVID-19 is spreading in your area. They are best placed to advise on what people in your area should be doing to protect themselves.

Protection measures for persons who are in or have recently visited (past 14 days) areas where COVID-19 is spreading
Follow the guidance outlined above.
Stay at home if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache and slight runny nose, until you recover. Why? Avoiding contact with others and visits to medical facilities will allow these facilities to operate more effectively and help protect you and others from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.
If you develop fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers. Why? Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also help to prevent possible spread of COVID-19 and other viruses.

https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public

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